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Should family members witness resuscitation attempts? Maybe there is no right answer

      In this issue of Resuscitation, Considine et al review the literature on family presence during the attempted resuscitation of adults from cardiac arrest
      • Considine J.
      • Eastwood K.
      • Webster H.
      • et al.
      For the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. Family presence during adult resuscitation from cardiac arrest: a systematic review.
      . They found no high certainty evidence on the topic; the impact on patient outcomes and the mental health of family members attending arrests were mixed. The effects on providers and their opinions on family attendance were also variable. However, it did seem that more experienced clinicians were less concerned about being observed by family members.
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